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functional training movement specialists bodywork massage zap zing

Best bodywork specialists in Denver. Trigger point therapy, functional movement, mobility training, personal training, therapeutic massage.

 

AT-Home regeneration!

The exercises, muscle-work, and movements shown below are intended for you to do on your own time to help regenerate and restore your powers!

 

General Rules

  • it takes time to unwind tight muscles and work out knots, adhesions and scar tissue. plan to spend anywhere from 3-10 minutes on a muscle at a time!
  • muscle work of any kind may cause you to feel tenderness, aches, tingling, or other sensations, in both the immediate area of work as well as surrounding areas (referred pain). This is common, and should stop when you stop the work.
  • Stop immediately if you experience any sharp, shooting, or intolerable pain. 
  • And finally, this is a reminder that we are not doctors. Our scopes of practice allow us to teach commonly accepted techniques on how to sustain healthy movement and living. The techniques, exercises, and our treatments are not intended to replace of any medical advice or diagnose, prevent, or treat disease.  
 

Psoas Release

Lay on your stomach and place a softball underneath you, just below your ribs and to the right of your belly button. Relax your body and let the softball 'melt' into your muscles. Stay here for about 3 minutes, then move the ball down (about the distance of the ball's circumference) and hold again for 3 minutes. Keep moving the ball down as low as you feel comfortable. When you reach your furthest point, move the ball back to the top and to the left of your belly button, and repeat the process. 

What can working on your psoas help with?

  • low back pain
  • cramps
  • indigestion
  • increase in hip flexing strength
  • increase in foundational core strength and stability

See General Rules, back to top


TFL Release

Lay on your side with your bottom leg straight, and place a lacrosse ball underneath your TFL. (Your TFL can generally be found between your hip bone and the crease formed when you lift your leg.) Bend your top leg 90 degrees and rest your knee on the floor - this creates a better angle to reach the TFL. Stay here for about 3 minutes.

What can working on your TFL help with?

  • low back pain
  • knee pain
  • foot pain
  • increase in knee mobility and stability
  • increase in lateral movement and strength

 

See General Rules, back to top


Obliques/Quadratus Lumborum

Lay on your side and place a softball underneath your body, in the space between your hip bone and lower ribs. This can be a sensitive area, so start out at about 30 seconds, and then switch to your other side. Go back and forth between both sides, spending about 5-10 minutes in total. 

What can working on your obliques/quadratus lumborum help with?

  • low back pain
  • increase in balance
  • increase in foundational core strength

 

See General Rules, back to top


Teres

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Lay on your back and place a tennis or lacrosse ball underneath the u-shaped area surrounding your armpit. As you find tender spots, hold on each spot for 3-5 minutes.

What can working on your teres muscles help with?

  • shoulder/rotator cuff pain
  • tingling/numbness in fingers
  • elbow pain
  • increased shoulder mobility

See General Rules, back to top


Serratus Anterior

Lay on your side and place a tennis or lacrosse ball where your scapula meets your ribs. Move the ball up and down the length of your scapula, finding tender spots and knots. Stay on each spot for 3-5 minutes.

What can working on your serratus muscles help with?

  • shoulder/rotator cuff pain
  • tingling/numbness in fingers
  • elbow pain
  • increased shoulder mobility

See General Rules, back to top


Adductors

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Two methods are pictured, with a bodywork tool, and a foam roller.

Lay on your side and using a bodywork tool, place the tip on your bottom leg, approximately 1-2 inches below your groin, in the mid portion of your leg. Using your top leg, apply downward pressure and hold.

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If using a foam roller, lay on your belly and angle one leg out to the side.  Place the foam roller underneath your inner thigh, and roll until you feel tenders spots. Hold tender spots until you feel muscle release.  

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What can working on your adductors help with?

  • low back pain
  • knee pain
  • groin pain

See General Rules, back to top


Latissimus Dorsi

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Using a foam roller, lay on your side and place the foam roller underneath your ribs, just below your scapula. Scrape your body forward (think you are pushing your skin backwards) and maintaining that pressure, lean backwards onto the foam roller. This method allows you to apply better pressure to the muscle. Stay in this position for 3-5 minutes or until you feel muscle release.

What does working on your lats help with?

  • back pain
  • tightness in shoulders
  • increase in pulling strength

See General Rules, back to top


Gluteus

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Lay on your back and place a tennis, lacrosse, or softball underneath the top portion of your buttocks (where it is less squishy, but below the ilium or bony portion of your lower back). On the side that the ball is located, your leg should be relaxed, and with the opposite leg bend your knee so that your foot can rest flat on the floor. This position allows you to control the amount of pressure you apply by dropping or holding up your hip. Hold this position for as long as you can or until you feel release. 

What does working on your glutes help with?

  • low back pain
  • hip pain
  • leg pain
  • sacrum pain
  • increase in back extension strength
  • increase in mobility and stability

See General Rules, back to top


Paraspinals

Lay on your back, and using two balls (tennis or lacrosse), place each ball on either side of your spine, starting at your thoracics (where your back starts to arch). Hold this position for a few minutes, then move the balls further up your spine and hold again. As you relax into the balls, move your arms out and over your head while maintaining contact with the ground, as if you were making 'snow angels'. Aim for ten slow repetitions. 

What does working on your thoracics help with?

  • low back pain
  • hip pain
  • improved posture
  • increase in back extension and strength
  • increase in mobility and stability
  • increase in shoulder mobility

See General Rules, back to top


Chest Openers

While standing, bend your elbows 90 degrees with palms facing up. In one movement, lift your chest upward while you pull your elbows down and backward, as if you can make your elbows touch behind your back. Hold for 5 seconds, then relax. Repeat 10 times. 

What does performing chest openers help with?

  • headaches
  • low back pain
  • improved posture
  • increase in back extension and strength
  • increase in mobility and stability
  • increase in shoulder mobility

See General Rules, back to top


Yes, No, Maybe!

Stand against wall with heels, butt, upper back, shoulders, and head against wall. Hold dumbbells, let them hang at your sides. Hold each position for 5 seconds before switching, and do each side 10 times before moving on: 1) (as in nodding “yes”…) Move head all the way up, and then all the way down (try and flatten neck against wall/get double chin action going!). 2) (as in shaking head “no”…) Turn head all the way to left, then all the way to the right. 3) (as in nodding “maybe”…) Tilt head, trying to bring left ear to left shoulder, then right ear to right shoulder. Avoid shrugging shoulders!

What does performing Yes, No, Maybes! help with?

  • headaches
  • low back pain
  • improved posture
  • increase in back extension and strength
  • increase in mobility and stability
  • increase in shoulder mobility

Bridges

Lay on the floor with your knees bent and feet flat on the ground. Squeeze your glutes and lift your hips off the ground, trying to get your body in line from shoulders to knees. Hold for five seconds then lower. Repeat 10-15 times.

What does performing bridges help with?

  • improved posture
  • strengthen glutes, lower back muscles
  • corrects muscle imbalances

 

See General Rules, back to top

 


Hip Hikes

Standing on a stable step or block with good posture, maintain a neutral pelvis and let your other leg hang free.  Slowly raise and lower the hip of your hanging leg. Your standing leg should be still, the knee can have a slight bend but the knee should not be moving to lift your hip. Work on one side 10-15 reps before switching sides.

What does performing hip hikes help with?

  • knee pain
  • increased hip mobility and strength
  • overall stability

See General Rules, back to top


Superheroes

There are three phases. Remember to focus on your lower back muscles, not your glutes or hamstrings! All on your belly:

1) Raise your left upper thigh off the ground just slightly. Hold for five seconds, repeat ten times. Switch to other leg for ten reps.

2) As this gets easier, raise your left arm while raising your right leg, hold for five seconds, then lower and switch sides. Repeat ten times.

3) Raise both arms and thighs off the ground, hold for 10-20 seconds, then lower. Repeat ten times.

What do superheroes help with?

  • low back pain
  • hip pain
  • leg pain
  • sacrum pain
  • increase in back extension strength
  • increase in mobility and stability

See General Rules, back to top

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Shin Lifts

Sit on a chair with your foot flat on the ground. Lift your foot upwards as high as you can while keeping your heel on the ground. Hold for five seconds, then lower. Repeat ten times before switching to other foot. Once this becomes easy, you may add resistance using a band.

What can shin lifts help with?

  • reduce shin splints
  • improve squat form
  • improve posture

 

See General Rules, back to top

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Leg Extensions

Sit in a chair with your feet on the ground and your shoulders and back against the back of the chair. Flex your right foot up so that your toes are pointing back towards you, then lift your foot upwards until your leg is fully extended. You want to feel a squeeze in the muscles immediately above your knee, or in other words, try to lift your kneecap. Hold this position for five seconds, then lower. Repeat 10-20 times, then switch legs.  

What do leg extensions help with?

  • knee pain
  • leg pain
  • tight hamstrings
  • increase in mobility and stability

 

 Extend so that you feel the squeeze of your muscles just above the kneecap.

Extend so that you feel the squeeze of your muscles just above the kneecap.


Single Arm Row

Place one knee and hand on a bench, with the other leg firmly on the floor and out to the side. Look up at the wall in front of you and arch your back. Move your working shoulder (the shoulder on the same side of your standing leg) down and back, or inwardly rotate your scapula, and at the same time engage your obliques to move your hip towards your shoulder. With your scapula and hips engaged, pull your elbow up, scraping your elbow against your ribs. Hold this position for 1-3 seconds, then lower, relaxing your hips, shoulder, and scapula. 

The focus is to retract your scapula and engage your obliques before you pull up. This motion will help to pinpoint and activate your lower lats. Perform this exercise slowly, and reset every time. Recommended 10 reps per arm, with as much weight as you can comfortably move with good form.

What do single arm rows help with?

  • increase shoulder/rotator cuff mobility and strength
  • reduce pain in shoulder/rotator cuff
  • strengthen back muscles
  • improve posture

See General Rules, back to top

What is the Zap Zing science all about? 

The human body is an amazing thing: it has the ability to heal itself, cope with a variety of stresses and traumas, and adapts to the demands placed on it. However, the body does not always cope and adapt in the preferred way. The demands of repetitive jobs and hobbies, and our modern lifestyle due to advances in technology means that our bodies are adapting and healing in ways that leave us with chronic pain or illnesses.

For example, sitting at a desk for eight hours a day, with forward hunching shoulders and repetitive finger movement can cause a multitude of issues ranging from numbness in your fingers, headaches, and low back pain to less obvious issues such as depression and anxiety. These ailments are caused by poor posture, inflammation, muscle adhesions and knots, and the pairing of over/underworked muscles. How about those of us who don’t have desk jobs – we are okay, right? Not quite. People who walk or stand all day may experience foot, ankle, or knee issues, low back pain, and a multitude of other issues, based on simple factors such as overtightened and overworked muscles, posting on one leg, or maintaining an improper posture.

Unfortunately, most people do not spend time maintaining their bodies like they should. Sure, we go to the gym or exercise, try to eat right, stretch occasionally, all in the name of trying to keep a healthy lifestyle. However, without a solid foundation, such as proper posture, or adequate muscle recovery techniques, such as bodywork (whether by yourself or with a professional), bodies will ultimately break down resulting in pain or chronic illness.

Here is the good news – with a basic foundation in movement and bodywork, you can heal from and prevent many of these issues.

At Zap Zing Bodyworx, our goal is to help people get out of pain and back on their feet (sometimes literally!) through smart and effective bodywork, education, and take home work. We believe that everybody is capable of living to the fullest and achieving goals beyond their limits, but oftentimes they need help reducing and preventing pain and illness in order to discover their full potential.

Christine Angelica, founder of Zap Zing Bodyworx, has developed AIM therapy; through AIM, she has effectively treated thousands of clients, ranging from pro MMA fighters to great-grandmothers, alleviating a multitude of issues. AIM stands for angles, integration, and muscle work, and as it implies, it includes a variety of modalities and techniques used, making this method the most effective and efficient form of bodywork you can receive.

How about you?

  • Have you ever awoken to numbness or tingling in your hands? Or is numbness constantly present?
  • Do you suffer from chronic pain (low back pain/sciatica/shoulder/joint, etc)?
  • Do you have depression, anxiety, or trouble dealing with stress?
  • Are migraines or constant/recurring headaches a problem?
  • Do you experience muscle weakness or decreased levels of performance/functionality?
  • Have you suffered from an injury or accident?

If any of these sound like you, or if you have a unique situation, give us a call! We would love to discuss with you the ways we can help.